Film & video

It's time to Rewild The Child

George Monbiot argues that the more time children spend in the classroom, the worse they do at school because our narrow education system only rewards a particular skill set. He says that when you take failing pupils to the countryside, they often thrive – yet funding for outdoor education is being cut.

 

Ma Forêt (My forest)

Short film  by Sebastien Pins, Belgium

"With the view of a child, travel throughout the forest to discover its magic, its mysteries and its meetings..."

Play Again

This moving and humorous documentary follows six teenagers who, like the “average American child,” spend five to fifteen hours a day behind screens. PLAY AGAIN unplugs these teens and takes them on their first wilderness adventure – no electricity, no cell phone coverage, no virtual reality. Through the voices of children and leading experts including journalist Richard Louv and geneticist David Suzuki, PLAY AGAIN investigates the consequences of a childhood removed from nature and encourages action for a sustainable future.

Project Wild Thing: The importance of Outdoor Play

David Bond is concerned. His kids' waking hours are dominated by a cacophony of marketing, and a screen dependence threatening to turn them into glassy-eyed zombies. Like city kids everywhere, they spend way too much time indoors - not like it was back in his day. He decides it's time to get back to nature - literally. In an attempt to compete with the brands, which take up a third of his daughter's life, Bond appoints himself Marketing Director for Nature.
David's humorous journey unearths some painful truths about modern family life.

Schools Out: Lessons from a Forest Kindergarten

An American documentary filmmaker journeyed to Switzerland to observe and document the school experiences of Swiss kindergartners whose parents choose to send them to “Forest Kindergarten.” These five- to seven-year-olds spend their school days not in a classroom but in a forest.

Join us!

We acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land on which we work, learn and play.

We thank them for sharing their culture and knowledge through stories, language, art and song.

We recognise the important role they have played for thousands of years and continue to play in caring for the land and waterways.  We pay our respects to the Elders past, present and future.

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